Pelican way of LIFE

Let’s protect the Dalmatian pelican together!

Sebastian Bugariu / Pelican way of LIFE

Pelican way of LIFE

Let’s protect the Dalmatian pelican together!

Project activities

What we do to protect Dalmatan pelicans

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Jari Peltomäki / Wild Wonders of Europe

Project activities

What we do to protect Dalmatan pelicans

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Project areas

Where we work

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Staffan Widstrand / Rewilding Europe

Project areas

Where we work

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About the project

Conservation of the Dalmatian pelican along the Black-Sea Mediterranean Flyway project (“Pelican Way of LIFE”) is the principal conservation project for the Dalmatian pelican (Pelecanus crispus) in Europe and at global scale. It aims to reduce the threats to the birds and improve their habitat at 27 sites in Romania, Bulgaria, Greece and Ukraine. It will also support capacity building and research in Turkey, Albania, Montenegro and North Macedonia.

Acronym:
Pelican Way of LIFE

Reference Code:
LIFE18 NAT/NL/000716

Duration:
5 years 7 months.
Start date: 01-09-2019.
End date: 31-03-2025

Total budget:
€ 1,773,676

EU contribution:
€ 1,330,255

This Project is co-funded by the LIFE Programme of the European Union.

Coordinating beneficiary:

 

The Dalmatian pelican is a globally threatened species. Extremely vulnerable across its entire geographical range, it is classified as “Near Threatened” on the IUCN Red List. The global population of the species has suffered a dramatic decline over recent decades, with the principal causes including collisions with power lines, habitat decline, disturbance, direct persecution by fishermen and a lack of awareness amongst local communities. These threats, combined with a lack of scientific data, make the future of the Dalmatian pelican heavily reliant on conservation action.

The global population of the Dalmatian pelican, which numbers around 20,000 individuals, is distributed across three areas. The Mediterranean-Black Sea flyway population, on which this project focuses, accounts for around half of the global total (more than 8000 breeding pairs).
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Objectives

Research

To improve knowledge of specific threats, sites and migration ecology, thereby enabling better management and conservation action decision making.

Involve

To involve local stakeholders in a set of conservation measures to reduce illegal killing and disturbance at key sites along the fly way.

Protect

To improve nesting conditions through habitat improvement actions and patrols.

Prevent

To reduce direct mortality from collisions with power lines.

Inspire

To boost community pride and support for the conservation of the Dalmatian pelican and associated Nature 2000 sites.

Inform

To raise awareness of local populations about the species, and to increase the engagement of stakeholders in its conservation.

Sebastian Bugariu / Pelican way of LIFE

Iconic species

With a wingspan of almost three meters and weighing in at over 10 kg, the Dalmatian pelican is one of the most impressive breeding birds in Europe. The sight of a group of these massive fish eaters taking to the air is an awe-inspiring avian spectacle.

In order to breed Dalmatian pelicans need access to still, fish-filled waters undisturbed by human activity, with extensive flooded and shallow water areas. They usually return to traditional breeding sites, which may contain anything from a single nest to more than 250 (they are less social than other pelican species). Their nests are crude heaps of vegetation, placed on islands or dense mats of vegetation. The Dalmatian pelican lays between one and six eggs, although two eggs is the most common clutch size – chicks are born naked, but soon sprout white down feathers. Offspring fledge at around 85 days, and become fully independent soon after.

With financial support and contribution of

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